GULAB JAMUN: A UNIQUE DESSERT WITH AN INTERESTING ORIGIN

Gulab Jamun is regarded as the most popular and delicious Indian dessert. However, this sweet dish is not of an Indian origin. Gulab Jamun is usually eaten after meals as a dessert. This particular delicacy is the most preferred one during festivals and weddings. Gulab jamun has gained immense popularity all over the globe. Thanks to its wonderful taste and unique presentation, this dessert is a delight for all sweet lovers. Gulab Jamuns are small deep-fried balls that are dipped in a sweet syrup. Gulab jamuns are golden brown in colour and are quite high on the sweetness because of the syrup. These days apart from the traditional version of Gulab jamuns many other different variations are also present.

According to theory, Gulab jamuns were originated in Persia which is now Iran. However, this wonderful dish made an entry in India from the Arabic dessert ‘Luqmat Al-Qadi’. Gulab Jamuns earned the top spot in the Indian dessert family during the Mughal era and since then have been unbeatable. Head to an Indian restaurant in Mount Waverley and binge on Gulab Jamuns.

Well, this dish has many tales attached to it. The preparation of Gulab Jamuns is also a worth telling episode. As per history, Gulab Jamuns were first just sprinkled with sugar syrup to add the sweet taste but steadily with new innovations these fried balls were dipped in sugar syrup. It is believed that Gulab Jamuns were initially regarded as the dish for royals and some also say that this dish came into being by accident!

Preparing perfect Gulab Jamuns is a difficult task to master. The balls need to be fried perfectly till they are golden brown or else they can get darker in their tone.

As per a well-known folklore, Gulab Jamun was first prepared by the chief Persian priest of Mughal king Shahjahan, the creator of one of the seven wonders, Taj Mahal. And at the time of Mughals ruling, it was introduced to the Indians, as a royal dessert. The word “Gulab” is derived from the Persian words Gul (flower) and db (water), referring to the rose water-scented syrup. “Jamun” is the Hindi word for an Indian fruit. As these sweet flitters are made similar size and shape of Janum, hence the name came Gulab Jamun. The Gulab Jamun originated from an Arabic dessert called Luqmat Al-Qadi . Originally, Luqmat Al-Qadi (the original dish) is made up of dough balls deep fried, soaked in honey syrup and sprinkled with sugar but in India, the recipe is different for preparing Gulab Jamun. Maybe the experiments were done by chefs of Mughal era and they eventually realized that balls made with Khoya tasted exceptional.

Ever heard of Gulab Jamun Ki Sabzi? It exists. Read the Recipe on Page 2

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YAKHNI PULAO: KNOW THE POPULAR DISH’S HISTORY

History of Yakhni Pulao

Yakhni is a yoghurt saffron based mutton broth, which is made using meat and aromatics. Yakhni is an integral part of the Kashmiri cuisine in India, which has arrived through Pakistani and Afghani cultures and spices. Considered as a gateway for the Mughal invaders to reach India, Afghanistan is the origin of Yakhni Pulao. 

Apparently, Yakhni Pulao has made its way in India through the Mughal invaders, which was used as a substitute for Biryani.

An interesting story which traces the origins of Yakhni Pulao is that when an anonymous Afghan king once visited the army barracks and found the army personnel under-nourished, he ordered the chef to prepare a vegetarian substitute for biryani which provided balanced nutrition in the right proportion, and thus the Yakhni Pulao was created.

It is generally believed that the popular dish originated in the Middle East. Here is the recipe ……..

Ingredients 

  • 1/2kg Goat meat
  • 2tbsp Oil (plus for frying onions)
  • 1/2tsp Cumin seed
  • 2inch Ginger (grated)
  • 1whole Bulb Garlic
  • 4-5Clove
  • 1inch Cinnamon
  • 6-8Black pepper
  • 3-4Black cardamom
  • 2-3Bay leaves
  • 5-6Onion (thinly sliced)
  • 1pinch Saffron
  • 3tbsp Milk
  • 3cups Rice
  • 2tbsp Ghee
  • 4tbsp Yogurt
  • 1tsp Garam masala
  • 4-5drops Kewda essence

 Method

YAKHNI PULAO

  • Wash and soak the rice in enough water for 30 minutes.
  • Make a bouquet gurney with cloves, cinnamon, black pepper, black cardamom and bay leaves.( tie the ingredients in a small piece of white cotton cloth )
  • Heat 2 tbsp oil in a pressure cooker.
  • When the oil is hot, add cumin seeds.
  • Add the meat, ginger, whole garlic bulb, salt, 4 cups water and the bouquet gurney in the pressure cooker.
  • Pressure cook till meat is nicely done ( approx 1 whistle on high heat and then simmer the heat and cook for 10 minutes )
  • Open the cooker once the pressure is released.
  • Check the meat for doneness and cook for some more time if required.
  • Let the mixture cool for some time.
  • Squeeze the Bouquet gurney and garlic bulb to extract the maximum flavours.
  • Pass the meat through a strainer and reserve the yakhani (stock).
  • Keep aside.
  • Fry the thinly sliced onions until golden brown.
  • Soak the saffron in milk and keep aside.
  • In a large, thick bottomed pan, heat ghee.
  • Add the meat pieces, yogurt, garam masala and little more than half of the fried onion
  • Fry for 4-5 minutes
  • Strain the rice and add it to the pan.
  • Measure the yakhani and add water to it to make 6 cups.
  • Add it to the pan.
  • Add the kewda essence and salt and cover the pan with the lid tightly.
  • Seal the edges with some dough (optional).
  • Simmer the heat to low and cook the rice till it is nicely done.
  • Add saffron soaked in milk over the rice and cover and keep for 10 minutes.
  • Fluff the Yakhni Pulao with a fork gently.
  • Garnish with golden fried onions.
  • Serve hot with raita.

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AMRITSARI CHOLEY

Like many other things the sad truth is even Chikpeas doesn’t belong to India. It is said that Mesopotamia or somewhere in the Arabian Desert the Chikpeas originally originated. We can still find the extinct of Chikpeas which are approx. 75 to 100 years old are found in Middle East and not in India. But nowadays 64% of chickpeas are harvested in India.

SOMETHING THAT IS NOT OURS…AND YET WE HAVE OWNED!

Who doesn’t love that scrumptious bite of flavourful and rich Amritsari Punjabi Choley in their food? Well, go ahead and try this recipe from the comfort of your home….

Ingredients

For Choley:

  • 1 Cup Chickpeas, Soaked Overnight
  • 1 Tbsp Tea Leaves
  • 2 Dried Red Chillies
  • 1 Inch Cinnamon Stick
  • 1 Black Cardamom
  • 2 Bay Leaves

AMRITSARI CHOLEY

For Choley Gravy:

  • 3 Tbsp Ghee / घी
  • 2 Tbsp Mustard Oil
  • 1 Black Cardamom
  • 2 Whole Red Chilli
  • 2 Bay Leaves
  • 1 Tsp Cumin Seeds
  • 1 Inch Ginger, Crushed
  • 4-5 Cloves Garlic, Crushed
  • 2 Medium Onion, Finely Chopped
  • ½ Tsp Turmeric Powder
  • 1 Tsp Coriander Powder
  • 1 Tsp Red Chilli Powder
  • Salt To Taste
  • 2 Medium Tomatoes, Chopped
  • 1 Tsp Garam Masala Powder
  • 1 Tsp Caraway Seeds
  • 3 Green Chillies, Slit
  • 1 Tbsp Pomegranate Seeds, Coarsely Ground

Method

For Choley:

  • Add soaked chickpeas in a deep bottomed pan along with enough water to boil the chickpeas.
  • Make a potli of tea leaves, dry red chillies, cinnamon stick, cardamom and bay leaves in a muslin

Cloth(potli)

  • Add this potli to the pan of boiling chickpeas.
  • Once cooked, discard the potli.
  • Reserve the boiled chickpea along with its stock.

For Choley Gravy:

  • In a kadhai, heat ghee and mustard oil on high flame.
  • Add black cardamom, whole red chilli, bay leaves and allow to splutter.
  • Add cumin seeds and let splutter. Add the ginger garlic to a mortar pestle and crush coarsely.
  • Add onions and cook till they turn brown.
  • Add turmeric powder, coriander powder and red chilli powder, saute for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add salt and mix well. Add tomatoes and cook till they turn soft and mushy.
  • Add green chillies and saute for a minute.
  • Now add the cooked chickpeas and cook along with the masala for 5-6 minutes.
  • Mix in garam masala powder and pomegranate seeds, mix well.
  • Use the reserved stock to adjust consistency and stir. Add in more water if required.
  • Cook on medium high flame until the gravy thickens.
  • Once cooked turn off the flame.
  • Garnish with ginger julienne, coriander leaves and serve hot along with kulcha.

 

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KELE KI MACHLI

KELE KI MACHLI

You’ll be surprised to know that Kele Ki Machli is a vegetarian dish although the name has machli (fish) in it. This delicious Kele Ki Machli is perfectly textured and shaped like a fish and has similarly layered aromatic spicing.

एक समाज आहे ‘कायस्थ’ (Kayastha is a caste in-between Brahmin & Kshatriya), पूर्वीच्या काळात कायस्थ मुघल ह्यांच्या दरबारात काम करत. जेंव्हा दावत असायची तेंव्हा  non vegetarian जेवण असायचे.  शाही डावात असल्याने त्यांना फार काही खाता येईना. पण ते घरी जाऊन जेवणाबद्दल सांगायचे. जेवणात मासे, मटणअसे पदार्थ असायचे. हे ऐकून घरातल्या गृहिणीना वाईट वाटायचे. त्याकाळी “जुगाड” करायची पद्धत जन्माला आली. मासे नाही तर नाही पण त्या सारखे दिसणारे आणि करी पण असावी आणि ती सुद्धा स्वादिष्ट. आणि अश्या तऱ्हेने “Kele Ki Machli” ह्या डिशचा जन्म झाला.

Ingredients

KELE KI MACHLI

  • 4 Raw Banana
  • Water For Boiling
  • 3-4 Desi Ghee
  • 1 Ginger
  • 1 Green Chilli
  • 1/2 Onion Paste
  • 1 Cup Curd
  • Salt
  • 1 Tbsp Red Chilli Powder
  • 1 Tsp Turmeric
  • 1 Tsp Coriander Powder
  • Water As Required
  • 1 1/2 Cup Gram Flour
  • 1 Tsp Salt
  • 1 Tbsp Red Chilli Powder
  • 1 Tsp Turmeric
  • 2-3 Tbsp Desi Ghee
  • 1/2 Onion
  • 1/2 Tomato
  • Coriander Leaves

 Method

  • To make Kele Ki Machli, boil whole bananas and water in a pan.
  • Add desi ghee, ginger, green chillies, onion paste, curd, salt, red chillies, turmeric, coriander powder, and water in a cooking pot and let it cook.
  • Then peel off the boiled bananas and fry it, and then in a bowl, mix gram flour, salt, red chilli and turmeric.
  • After that, wrap the bananas in gram flour and fry it in a pan with desi ghee.
  • Now in another pan, roast the onions and tomatoes in desi ghee.
  • Take out the curry in a plate and serve it with coriander leaves, banana fish, onions and tomatoes.

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HARE SEB(APPLE) KI SABJI

In Monsoon when the whole of India is busy eating various Pakoras, Himachal is busy plucking of Green Apples. Recipe first tried in Kinnaur, Himachal Pradesh. This recipe is made using green apples and is mostly cooked in Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh in monsoon. This is a dish with no Onions, garlic or any other garam masala. Simple preparation with Khatta Meetha and spicy taste. Goes very well with hot Steam Rice. Try this and let us know your experience…..

 Ingredients

HARE SEB KI SABJI

  • 5 – 7 tbsp ghee
  • 1 – 2 tsp black cumin seeds
  • 1 cup yoghurt
  • 1 – 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp red chilli powder
  • 1 tbsp coriander powder
  • salt as per taste
  • 5 – 6 green apples
  • 1/2 cup walnut paste
  • water as required
  • 20 gm raisins
  • 1/4 tsp fenugreek seeds
  • 10 – 12 walnuts

 Method

  • Heat ghee in a pan and add black cumin seeds, yoghurt, turmeric, red chilli powder, coriander powder, salt and mix well.
  • Add chopped green apples, walnut paste, water, raisins and mix again.
  • Let the mixture cook for 5 to 7 minutes.
  • In another pan, heat ghee and saute fenugreek seeds, walnuts and add to the apples.
  • Hare Seb Ki Sabji is ready to serve.

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DOODH SAAR

दुध सार हि डीश गोड नसून तिखट आहे. ह्या डिशचा जन्म  राधानगरी(कोल्हापूर पासून साधारण ५० किमी) येथे झाला. फार पूर्वी जेंव्हा  व्यापारी आपले सामान घेऊन जात काही वेळा ते राधानगरी येथे वस्तीला थांबायचे. ह्या व्यपरंमध्ये शाकाहारी व्यापारी असायचे ज्यांना मांसाहारी सारखे तिखट रस्सा खायला आवडायचा. ह्या  कारणामुळे तिकडच्या स्थायिक खानावळीतील आचार्याने दुधापासून तिखट रस्सा तयार केला जो व्यापाऱ्यांच्या पसंतीस उताराला. तर असा झाला जन्म “दूध सार” ह्या डिशचा. हि डिश अलीकडच्या काळात जास्त प्रचलित नसल्याने खूप कमी ओळखली जाते.

Doodh Saar is a popular Maharashtrian delicacy that was first made in a small town Radhanagri in Maharashtra. This is a spicy curry made using milk and the famous Kolhapuri masala.

Recipe of Doodh saar on Page 2

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WHEN INDIAN RAILWAYS’ SERVICE BEAT EVEN THE BEST HOTELS

From Railway Mutton Curry To Bedmi-Aloo: When Railway Food Was An Affair To Remember. What Is Your Earliest Memory Of (Good) Train Food?

It was the first train to have a full fledged restaurant car replete with trained butlers, chefs, cleaners and an a la carte menu to match the grandeur of a well-stocked bar! Dining cars on Mail and Express trains appeared as early as 1903, the same year in which 8-wheeled carriages running on bogies were introduced. Prior to this, all important trains were allowed sufficient halts at appointed stations, for breakfast, lunch or dinner to be had at one of the several refreshment rooms available at the platform: Refreshment Room, European; Refreshment Room, Muslim; Refreshment Room, Hindu – Vegetarian, and Refreshment Room, Hindu – Non Vegetarian.

But it wasn’t till the Frontier Mail (renamed Golden Temple Mail post independence) that restaurant car upped its ante. Run by the Western Railway, the train was considered Rolls Royce of its time – both for its luxury (it had bedrolls, a shower, a salon and even a steam room) and the inimitable dishes it served. It was the first time that Roast Chicken was introduced to the Indian palate, soon followed by Madras spicy mutton curry and rice, the chicken cutlet (which came close to the kebabs) and the now famous Railway Mutton Curry. The iteration of which made it in to the richer food corridors of hotels like The Oberoi and Made in Punjab among others. Story goes that a drunken British officer stumbled into the kitchen looking for midnight snack. The service was over and the cooks were making food for them. One dish was the Calcutta Murgir Jhol, made of farm bred chicken, Dak Bangla style, it was known for its fiery taste. Understandably, the British didn’t appreciate a burnt stomach, but was overjoyed when in an instant the dish was changed from a spicy chicken curry to a Mutton Curry subtle one with yogurt. Such was the impression that the officer ordered it every time he was on the train, and fondly called it the Railway Mutton Curry. And thus was born – The Railway Mutton Curry. Of course the Alam Shah khansama’s invention did undergo the railway ‘touch’, which by then was ‘subtle-izing” Indian flavours to suit the British palate. Of course the rail chefs, who were khansamas of lesser clout, did their magic by creating some addictive dishes like the railway tomato soup (a more mashed up version still exists in Rajdhani), the Bihari Kebab, the Sitaphal Ice Cream with Kalakhatta Gola. Bedmi-aloo comprises puffy deep fried puri like bread served with spicy potato curry. 

Given below are the 03 most liked recipes on train pre Independence which are definitely worth trying even now:

  1. Railway Mutton Curry- (An Anglo-Indian Delicacy)- Page 2
  2. Murgir Jhol – Page 3
  3. Bedmi-Aloo – Page 4

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पनीरच्या शोधाची ही रंजक कहाणी

शाकाहारी जेवणात अगदी हमखास असलेला रॉयल पदार्थ म्हणजे पनीर… पूर्वी पनीर अगदी उच्चभ्रू लोकांकडेच खाल्ले जात होते. पण आता पनीर सगळेच खातात. आता तर तुमच्या आमच्या अविभाज्य जीवनाचा भागच पनीर झाला आहे. घरी काही खास असले आणि व्हेज मेन्यू करायचा ठरला की, हमखास पनीरचा वापर केला जातो. पनीरची भाजी, पनीर पुलाव, पनीरचे स्टाटर्स असे वेगवेगळे पदार्थ पनीरपासून तयार केले जातात. सध्या स्टाटर्सपासून मेनकोर्सपर्यंत सगळ्याच पदार्थांमध्ये पनीर वापरले जाते. पण या पनीरचा शोध नेमका लागला कसा हे तुम्हाला माहीत आहे का? जाणून घेऊया पनीरचा इतिहास

जुन्या दाखल्यांनुसार पनीरचा शोध हा 17 व्या शतकात भारतातील बंगाल येथे लागला. त्या काळात देशात पोर्तुगीजांचे राज्य होते. दुधात सायट्रीक अॅसिडची प्रक्रिया करुन पनीर तयार करण्याचा शोध पोर्तुगीजांनी लावला. त्यानंतर बंगालमध्ये दूध फाडून पनीर बनवण्यास सुरुवात झाली. पण पनीर हा शब्द आधी प्रचलित नव्हता. ‘छेना’ या नावाने पनीर ओळखले जात होते.

फारच कमी लोकांना छेना हा शब्द माहीत असेल. पनीर हा शब्द पर्शियन शब्द आहे. हाच शब्दनंतर प्रचलित झाला आणि आता याच नावाने हा पदार्थ ओळखला जातो. पनीरला इंग्रजीमध्ये चीझ म्हणूनच ओळखले जात होते. पण नंतर त्यााला कॉटेज चीझ अशी ओळख मिळाली. वेगवेगळ्या देशांमध्ये पनीर खाल्ले जाते. त्याला वेगवेगळ्या नावाने ओळखले जात असले तरी पनीर हा सर्वसाधारण शब्द यासाठी वापरला जातो.

Kadai Paneer  One of the most popular dish in any restaurant serving Indian Food from a road side Dhabha to any 5 star hotel….

As its self explanatory from the name, its paneer made in kadai. However, strictly speaking, one does need to make it in Kadai, but any pan is fine. I believe this concept of Kadai worked in old days when Kadai used to be made of iron only and cooking in iron utensils was deemed as a source of adding iron in the food

Recipe on Page 2

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PAKORA, THE SOUL FOOD FOR EVERYONE

The monsoon brings with it an array of cravings. Some fried, some deep fried and certain other crunchy, sweet or salty cravings. We seek comfort in food that is enticing and appetizing. The best way to enjoy the weather is with a plate full of deep fried pakoras. Pakoras are wrapped in besan or gram flour, crispy snack where seafood and other vegetables, chicken, seafood  are coated in a light batter and fried golden.

The word pakora is derived from Sanskrit pakvavata, a combination of pakva “cooked”, and vata, “a small lump”. Most sources indicate that pakoras originated in Gujarat, in Western India. Gujaratis traditionally eat pakoras at tea-time.

Quite popular during monsoon time as pakoras goes very well with a cup of Tea. the recipes for making pakoras have more or less the same Indian spices and herbs and often vary in their proportions. Each state of India have their own variation in making pakoras, so the recipes do differ and so does the flavour and taste.

Onion Pakora- Recipe on page 2 | Bhindi Pakora – Recipe on page 3 | Chicken Pakora -Recipe on page 4 | 

Fish Pakora – Recipe on page 5  

Baingan/Eggplant Pakora – Recipe on page 6Rice Pakora – Recipe on page 7

 

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RABINDRANATH TAGORE: THE FOODIE

The Nobel laureate loved playing with cuisines as much as he loved juggling with emotions in his poems, songs, stories, paintings and much more. Here’s taking a little peek into the foodie side of Rabindranath Thakur.

Rabindranath would himself experiment and make different kind of omelettes and kebabs.  Among his favourite kebabs, which reportedly came out of the Thakurbari kitchen, quite a few were influenced from the recipes he brought back from Turkey and Afghanistan

Unique Short Recipes from The Tagore’s Kitchen

 

Fish Stir-fry (Maach Chachchari)

 Fish Stir-fry (Maach Chachchari)

Fry the fish. You’ll need potatoes and onions. Heat oil to fry onions and then add the potatoes.  When the potatoes turn brown, add turmeric and red chili paste. Add salt and green chili. You may add tomatoes if you’d like. After frying the spices, add water and cover.  Add fish to the boiling sauce. Cook till the gravy thickens.

 

 

Mourala Fish

Mourala Fish (Anchovies) Sour (Mourala Maacher Ambal): 

Fry the fish in oil, then add turmeric. Add green tamarind puree. Add sugar and salte to taste and cook till the sauce thickens. Ripe tamarind puree can also be used.

 

 

 

EGG CHAO CHAO

Egg Chao Chao: 

Eggs – 4; Onions – 6; Dry red chili whole – 4; Garlic –  4 cloves; A pinch of turmeric, little cumin seeds (jeera), salt and clarified butter (ghee). Make a paste of red chilies, garlic, turmeric, and cumin. Slice the onions into fine shred.  Heat ghee on a pan and fry the onions. Add the spice paste and fry well. Break the eggs and mix it into spices. Cook in low heat. When the egg cooks and turn reddish, add a little water and salt. When the water dries off, the dish is done.

 

Keema Dahi Vada

Keema Dahi Vada (Fried meat balls in yogurt): 

Mix minced meat (lamb or goat), boiled potatoes, minced green chilies, onions, and salt. Add eggs and some garam masala and make a dough. If the dough is too soft, add bread to the mix. Make small balls and fry.  Beat yogurt with a pinch of salt. Add roasted red chili and cumin powder to the yogurt and blend. Add the fried meat balls to the yogurt. Garnish with good quality ghee (clarified butter).

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Compiled from a study of various sources, websites and articles available on Rabindranath Tagore. Any addition, clarification or correction will be taken as a value-addition and not a criticism

Read Some More Recipes from Tagore’s Kitchen On The Following Pages:

  • BHAPA ILISH RECIPE- Recipe Page 2
  • Kabishambardhana Burfi/ Cauliflower Burfi – Recipe Page 3
  • Mutton Curry (Tagore family’s recipe) / Kosha Mangsho – Recipe Page 4
  • Niramish Dimer Dalna (Vegetarian Egg Curry) – Recipe Page 5
  • Shorshe Mangsho – Mustard Mutton –  Recipe Page 6